Living at Hogwarts with Apple Pencil and Google Home

Technology is not magic, but Steve Jobs was correct when he described the iPad as “a magical device” in 2010. Combined with the Apple Pencil, which feels like a wand from the wizarding world of Harry Potter, an iPad and the Google Home smart assistant make me feel like I’m truly living at Hogwarts. The powers these digital devices put at my fingertips and on the tip of my tongue to control my environment and extend the reach of my ideas are truly stunning, even for a child of the 1980s who grew up with technology tools and witnessed the dawn of the Internet age in college. These tools are not only amazing for what they allow me to do with my voice and a flick of my wrist today, they’re also remarkable for how they continue to improve and advance in their capabilities. This is particularly true for smart assistants like Google Home, powered by machine learning and artificial intelligence. There is no better front row seat to the transformational changes being wrought in our society by AI technologies than the smart assistant microphone and speaker in your kitchen or in your smartphone.

In the past few months, I have found myself listening to podcasts more frequently using my Google Home smart speakers, even though I’ve listened to podcasts since the mid-2000s on iPods and iPhones, and still love my smartphone podcatching app, Pocket Casts (@pocketcasts). Podcasting continues to experience wonderful growth among both listeners/consumers as well as creators/producers. I share Larry Lessig’s (@lessig) optimism that podcasting has a powerful potential role to play in the “slow democracy movement” which promises to restore thoughtful and deliberative group decisionmaking to our political landscape hijacked by Twitter-using, illiterate narcissists.

Although “the old tools” of podcast consumption have grown markedly better with the passage of time, podcast listening on a smart speaker is even better and easier in many ways. I love the cloud-synced, sharable OPML backup capability of Pocket Casts, for example. I also love how Pocket Casts lets me jump forward 45 seconds or back 10 seconds with the tap of my finger. On Google Home, however, I can use a voice command to skip forward or backward as needed, in any time increment I desire.

It is also MUCH easier, when I want to listen to a podcast, to simply say out loud (within earshot of a Google Home smart speaker):

Hey Google, play the latest episode of the BBC History Hour podcast.

As long as I remember the name of the podcast and can say it in the correct word sequence / syntax (hence the metaphor here to “casting spells” like Harry Potter) I can not only listen to podcasts on my smart speaker, I can also pause, stop, and resume listening on different smart speakers in our home and even using the Google Assistant app on my iPhone, if I leave the house to go somewhere in the car or take a walk. Last year when I “went Android” for a terrifying 8 months (in the opinion of our two teenage daughters, who have typically inherited older smartphone devices from their bleeding-edge technology using parents) I anticipated a better Google Assistant experience compared to iOS. While the Google Assistant is definitely better and more powerful today than Siri, my experiences with “Hey Google” are that capabilities are equivalent on iOS compared to Android when you use Google’s app. Pausing and resuming podcasts on different devices isn’t perfect, sometimes Google can’t pick up on a show where I left off… but usually it can. And that is really a powerful capability. It’s also a capability that is only in its infancy today. It’s just getting better with the passage of time. This is TRANSFORMATIVE for my personal learning, not merely a substitution of an existing capability, because I find myself listening to more podcasts, with greater frequency, because I can use the simple power of my voice to access and control the smart speakers in our home and in my pocket / on my iPhone.

I am not exaggerating or kidding when I say or write this: I feel like Harry Potter at Hogwarts using my voice to trigger podcasts and control their playback wherever I am, as long as the Google Assistant is waiting nearby to respond to my latest verbalized wish. We have not fully jumped onto the smart home / Internet of Things (IoT) bandwagon with lots of web-enabled devices at our house, but we don’t need to for me to feel like a powerful wizard in my own castle. Google Home and the Google Assistant’s capability to let users access and control playback of podcasts via their voice is a magical technology, and I am thrilled to live in the era of earth history when powers like these have become affordably accessible to mere muggles such as myself.

My wizarding powers attributable to new digital technologies go beyond spellcasting via smart assistants, however. The Apple Pencil not only looks like a wand, it feels like a wand and it ACTS like a wand. Therefore, in my book, the Apple Pencil IS a wand! While my own sketchnoting skills are very rudimentary and not something I’m going to win any awards for, visual notetaking is something I find both challenging and rewarding to do when I can.

I am including both sketchnoting and narrated sketchnoting as chapters in an online book about sharing your faith via media I’m finally going to release as an eBook and printed book in 2019. Visual notetaking, or sketchnoting, is one of my favorite media projects and learning strategies included in the “Show with Media” digital literacy framework. I’ve used a lot of different tablet styluses in the past ten years, and I can say unequivocally that nothing holds a candle to the Apple Pencil. The Apple Pencil version 2.0 raises the bar even higher. I’ve had the opportunity to help several of our elementary as well as secondary faculty at school “make the move” from using an Interactive Whiteboard (SmartBoard) to using an iPad with a stylus, and this transition is SO much easier to make thanks to the precision and stray mark forgiveness which are hallmarks of the Apple Pencil.

If you haven’t personally experienced both the power of a smart speaker when it comes to podcast listening, as well as the Apple Pencil in creating sketchnotes, you need to soon. We’re living in a Harry Potter wizarding world now, for those who are empowered with these new digital technologies. Practice your spells and commit to using your powers for good and not for evil. The world of magical wizardry is here, even for Muggles who grew up in the analog world of yesterday.

When it comes to digitally powered spells and wands, we’re just getting started. Hold on to your hats!

If you enjoyed this post and found it useful, consider subscribing to Wes’ free, weekly newsletter. Generally Wes shares a new edition on Monday mornings, and it includes a TIP, a TOOL, a TEXT (article to read) and a TUTORIAL video. You can also check out past editions of Wes’ newsletter online free!


Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and “eBook singles?” 1 of them is available free! Check them out! Also visit Wes’ subscription-based tutorial VIDEO library supporting technology integrating teachers worldwide!

MORE WAYS TO LEARN WITH WES: Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes’ free magazine “iReading” on Flipboard! Follow Dr. Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also “like” Wes’ Facebook page for “Speed of Creativity Learning“. Don’t miss Wesley’s latest technology integration project, “Show With Media: What Do You Want to CREATE Today?

Self-Censorship, Echo Chambers and Civil Political Discourse

It’s been an even more tumultuous and troubling week for the United States government than usual, in a presidential term characterized by constant controversy and disruption. The announcement that our chief executive is pulling out all our military forces from Syria without prior consultation with his cabinet or military advisors, and the subsequent resignation of the Secretary of Defense in response, are extraordinary events that all citizens of the United States should take time to consider and discuss. Last night, I shared a post on Facebook, reflecting about these events, and my personal prayer that leaders in Washington D.C. will have the courage to invoke provisions of the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. I’m not alone in thinking along these lines, some of our Congressional representatives have been thinking publicly about this as well.

I do not usually share political posts or many political thoughts on my Facebook page, but I do occasionally. I’m very aware, much as I am at church, that a diverse group of folks “virtually surround me” on my Facebook page. This has changed over time, but for at least the past few years I’ve used my personal Facebook page primarily to share photos and posts about our family and my Christian faith.

Facebook presents interesting opportunities as well as challenges to all of us these days. There is not “1 approved way” to use Facebook, and we certainly see people and organizations using the platform in diverse ways. Of course I’m aware how heated our political discussions are today both on social media and in the mainstream press, but I was perhaps a bit naive in sharing my thoughts last night on Facebook. I stand by everything I wrote, but after receiving two very negative responses on the post, I decided to archive it with screenshots and then delete it. I also created a new Facebook post, sharing a little about the fact that I’d deleted the post and would be reflecting later on my blog about this in greater detail. Here is the original post, with the comment responses included below.

With hindsight significantly augmented by the thoughtful feedback of friends and acquaintances whose opinions I respect, I think should have left the original post on Facebook and let others chime in to the conversation thread. I was touched and moved by many of the comments my “I’ve deleted a post” message invited. Here is a screenshot of that complete thread, as of tonight (Saturday, 22 Dec 2018):

I have several different thoughts and responses to all of this, which was more than I could articulate this afternoon when I was receiving this feedback on my smartphone following a movie I went to watch with our son, some errands to an overcrowded local mall, and some holiday food shopping.

First of all, how wonderful it is to be able to receive encouragement and feedback like the comments shared on this second “I deleted a post” thread. People contributing to this conversation include:

  • Colleagues at my current school and in other Oklahoma educational organizations, with whom I work and have worked
  • A classmate and squadron-mate from the US Air Force Academy
  • A peer and colleague / tech director at another independent school
  • One of my dearest and best teachers from high school, who did more to shape my love of political science, the study of government and advocacy in public affairs than anyone else in my educational career
  • Other educators with whom I’ve interacted over the years via social media, but not ever met face-to-face

This collection of supportive and encouraging perspectives is remarkable to me by itself. I heartily agree with the sentiment expressed by several, that we NEED opportunities for “true civil discourse” in our country today… and we SHOULD be both encouraged and supported in respectfully sharing our perspectives and opinions on political issues. Mrs. Bogart (and others) are right: We need to be courageous to share our voices, even in these contentious times, because it is only through dialog and conversations that we can move forward in our thinking as individuals and as a community.

So, to everyone who read (or is now reading, thanks to the screenshot) the original post I wrote but then deleted… I am sorry. I will commit to not self-censor my voice again simply because it invites some negative feedback. When I deleted the post this morning, my main thought was, “I don’t really want to host a confrontational exchange on my Facebook page between those who are critical of our current chief executive and those who still support him.” In the past I’ve been generally careful to steer clear of sharing opinions online about very divisive and contentious political and social issues, since most of my online advocacy (since 2003) has focused primarily on education and educational technology. I AM a passionate, concerned and (hopefully) informed citizen, however, and I do want my voice to play a constructive role in the conversations we have in our communities and as a larger society about important issues.

Since I’m involved in many conversations at our school about social media, screentime and “digital citizenship,” I’m often asking myself how controversial situations involving digital media can become “teachable moments” in our classrooms and homes? Here are a few questions which come to mind, having received a little negative but a LOT of positive feedback over a Facebook post in the past 24 hours:

  • How do you decide how to respond to someone who disagrees with you, gets angry at you, criticizes you, or harasses you on social media?
  • What responsibilities (if any) do individual users of a social media platform (like Facebook) have for moderating or (in extreme cases) censoring interactions which take place between other users on their posts?
  • Do you want to use your social media pages and profiles to share political opinions or links with others? Why or why not?
  • What are the risks to sharing political opinions online?
  • If you limit the types of opinions you share online (whether they are political, religious, or fall into another category) how do you draw that line and why have you made those decisions?
  • How can we encourage more civil discourse in our communities and in our nation, instead of the vitriolic exchanges which seem to have become the “norm?”
  • How can “bad actors” like trolls on social media be stopped from attacking people who speak out in the mainstream media? (i.e. “Gamergate“)
  • How can interactive website designers create environments which support the value of civil discourse?

Long live free speech and the tools to “publish at will.” At the same time, I champion respect, kindness, civility, and the willingness to listen to perspectives which are different from our own.

If you enjoyed this post and found it useful, consider subscribing to Wes’ free, weekly newsletter. Generally Wes shares a new edition on Monday mornings, and it includes a TIP, a TOOL, a TEXT (article to read) and a TUTORIAL video. You can also check out past editions of Wes’ newsletter online free!


Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and “eBook singles?” 1 of them is available free! Check them out! Also visit Wes’ subscription-based tutorial VIDEO library supporting technology integrating teachers worldwide!

MORE WAYS TO LEARN WITH WES: Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes’ free magazine “iReading” on Flipboard! Follow Dr. Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also “like” Wes’ Facebook page for “Speed of Creativity Learning“. Don’t miss Wesley’s latest technology integration project, “Show With Media: What Do You Want to CREATE Today?

A Creepy and Troubling Hidden WordPress Hack

It’s almost Christmas and our family is again planning to celebrate with a special dinner of prime rib. This has become a holiday tradition but is a big deal for us, since this is the only time all year I do any cooking of prime rib meat. Today before going shopping, I searched our family learning blog WordPress site (“Learning Signs“) for past posts I’d written about this favorite holiday meal. I needed to confirm how large a prime rib I’d purchased in the past, and was also interested in reading the lessons learned and suggestions I’d documented in the past. I’ve written posts in 2011, 2013, 2015, and 2016 on this topic.

I found the 2016 post on my iPhone , “Best Christmas Dinner Ever: Prime Rib,” but was immediately alarmed when I read it to see references and links to things like motorized scooters, instant loans, and airsoft guns. I realized immediately that my website had been hacked, since I had not included those things in my post two years ago… but it wasn’t immediately clear if my entire website was compromised.

Customized WordPress Hack
Highlights show words and links added to my post by a hacker

This is how the post SHOULD have appeared, and does now since I used WordPress’ built in “revision history” to roll back the post to its original version.

Prime Rib Blog Post
My corrected / original WordPress Post About Holiday Prime Rib

I have, unfortunately, dealt with WordPress hacks on my own websites and those administered and hosted by others several times in the past. My earliest experience with them may have been 10 years ago, in 2008. In most cases, the entire WordPress site was compromised and I had to either restore the entire thing from a BackupBuddy backup, or pay a reputable WordPress security company (like Securi) to clean it up. The “vector” used by hackers in all these cases wasn’t necessarily clear… In some, the WordPress installation and associated plug-ins hadn’t been updated regularly as they should be. In others, I suspected weak passwords. In each of those past cases, however, the hackers had taken advantage of a vulnerability and rendered the site so corrupted I couldn’t repair it directly myself.

In today’s case, it appears that this single post from 2016 was targeted and edited to include links the hacker was most likely paid to insert. What was surprising and alarming, however, was the way in which the language of the post was altered, so the new sentences and links ALMOST flowed with my original verbiage. This does not appear to have been a bot attack, I think this was someone crafting language by hand and inserting links into this specific post… possibly because it was highly ranked on Google and other search engines at the time. I haven’t updated all my WordPress sites to SSL as recommended, and this has significantly hurt my SEO (search engine optimization) rankings. Starting in July 2018, Google began marking all websites as “insecure” in its search results and in the Chrome web browser if they don’t use encryption. I looked into the steps for doing this, but because I maintain so many sites and have been too professionally busy with other things, I haven’t made these code changes yet.

Closer inspection to the revision history for this hacked webpage revealed that the latest unauthorized change took place 9 months ago.

WordPress Revision Comparison 1
Revision history shows hacked changes 9 months ago

A series of changes had actually been made in the preceding months, going all the way back to August 2018.

WordPress Revision Comparison 2
First unauthorized hack of this WordPress post

I am glad there have not been any new changes to the post in the past 9 months, but of course I’m concerned there may be other posts that are also compromised. I have over 450 posts on the “Learning Signs” blog, so this isn’t something I can readily scan over.

A few months ago, I changed the hosting company for most of my websites, and at that time I deactivated all the administrator accounts on that website, just keeping my own. I also changed my administrator password to a much more secure (long and random) version, and ensured iThemes Security Pro was properly installed and configured. I’d previously used the WordFence security plugin for WordPress, but had some hacking problems even when it was installed so I changed everything over to iThemes Security.

Today I enabled logging features in iThemes Security Pro, so all admin user access is logged. I’ll try and keep an eye on this in upcoming weeks. I’d like to find a way to show a list of all my posts on the site, sorted by the date each was last modified. That way, I could identify unusual descrepancies between original publishing dates and more recent modification dates. I looked at a few plugins but couldn’t find a way to readily do this. If you have any suggestions on that front, please let me know with a comment or by reaching out to my on Twitter @wfryer.

Hopefully this situation will not repeat itself. It’s a bad feeling to have words and links you never wrote or inserted put into a blog post you’ve published out ‘for the world.” 🙁

(You can view comments and add comments about this post on this Facebook thread. Also feel free to reach out to me on Twitter @wfryer. Or comment below!)

If you enjoyed this post and found it useful, consider subscribing to Wes’ free, weekly newsletter. Generally Wes shares a new edition on Monday mornings, and it includes a TIP, a TOOL, a TEXT (article to read) and a TUTORIAL video. You can also check out past editions of Wes’ newsletter online free!


Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and “eBook singles?” 1 of them is available free! Check them out! Also visit Wes’ subscription-based tutorial VIDEO library supporting technology integrating teachers worldwide!

MORE WAYS TO LEARN WITH WES: Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes’ free magazine “iReading” on Flipboard! Follow Dr. Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also “like” Wes’ Facebook page for “Speed of Creativity Learning“. Don’t miss Wesley’s latest technology integration project, “Show With Media: What Do You Want to CREATE Today?

Chromebook and Home Computer Advice for Parents (Dec 2018)

As a school director of technology as well as a known “tech geek” at other places we frequent like our church, I’m often asked for advice about purchasing computers for kids at holiday time. I’m also frequently asked about Internet filtering, Internet safety, and topics falling under the general topic of “digital citizenship.” (Last spring I shared a few presentations about these topics at both school and church.) Whether we’re talking about technology purchases, parenting, or just about anything else, it’s VERY important to be cautious giving advice to others. If your recommendation is taken and it doesn’t work out well, you’ve set yourself up to be blamed. While I’ve included the word “advice” in the title of this post, please take these ideas as more as GUIDELINES rather than advice. Of course computer models and other technology items are going to change quickly, so it’s more important to think about “guidelines to follow” when making technology purchases rather than strictly following someone else’s recommendation list.

Blocked Domain - OpenDNS by Wesley Fryer, on Flickr
Blocked Domain – OpenDNS” (CC BY-SA 2.0) by Wesley Fryer

Guideline #1: Install a Home Content Filtering Solution

Whatever type of computer you purchase for kids living in your house, it’s vital to put in place a content filtering solution. “Parental controls” on computers, tablets and smartphones can be helpful, but when it comes to computers at home it can be more effective as well as flexible to put web filtering tools in place at the Internet modem / router level. This means ALL devices which access the Internet at your house via WiFi are subject to at least a basic level of web filtering.

Remember no web filtering solution is perfect, and like anything involving security, you want to adopt a “layered” approach which includes multiple strategies. Here are some of my favorite home web filtering tools, which I have either used in the past, am using currently, or am considering next:

  1. Circle With Disney: When we bought our Circle it cost $100, now you get can them for $55. When you setup the Circle at your house, all devices connecting to your network via WiFi or wired ethernet can be filtered depending on settings you specify. Younger kids can have more filtering, bedtimes when devices stop being able to access the Internet can be set, and time limits for different kinds of apps and websites can be created for different kids. Circle is GREAT, and they also offer a $5 per month service (Circle Go) which allows smartphones to be filtered even when they are off-wifi and using cellular data. This uses a VPN connection along with MDM (mobile device management) setup. It sounds complicated, but the Circle folks make the setup pretty straightforward. Circle is my top recommendation for most families needing a web filtering solution at home.
  2. OpenDNS: I first used OpenDNS at home ten years ago, after I learned about it during a visit to our local Apple Store. Since then, I used it at home until we installed our Circle for content filtering. They offer a free option as well as a $20/year “Home VIP” tier of service which includes some data logging. Back in 2011 I shared a post about how to configure OpenDNS on an Apple home router, but their documentation is excellent and can help you get setup with whatever networking gear you’re using. Basically, you change the network DNS settings on your home router to those managed by OpenDNS instead of the default ones, likely provided by your Internet Service Provider from whom you purchase Internet access each month. While it’s not rocket science for a determined kid (or adult) to bypass these DNS settings on a particular device, it does require a bit more tech-savvy and for a free price tag, OpenDNS is a good solution… especially when your kids are younger / pre-teens.
  3. Eero Plus: For many months now, I’ve been wanting to upgrade our home WiFi to a next-generation mesh solution. One of the best is Eero, and they offer a $99 per year subscription called Eero Plus which includes content filtering for all network devices. If I had an extra $400 to drop on an Eero paired with two Eero Beacons, I’d upgrade tomorrow and also pay $99 per year for Eero Plus. I’ve visited with some parents at our school who migrated to Eero Plus from Circle and they have been pleased with the service. I don’t think it offers the off-network filtering of Circle Go, but it still looks like a good solution to address many home content filtering concerns.
  4. iOS 12 Parental Controls: If your kids are using iPhones or iPads, definitely consider setting up and using the free / included parental control settings. These are better than ever with iOS 12, and depending on the age of your kids may make a good addition to a network filtering solution like Circle. This CNET article includes good tips for monitoring and managing screentime as well as apps on iOS 12.

Guideline #2: Consider Chromebooks or Chromeboxes as Home Computers

As a school technology director, I’m directly responsible for providing support for over 300 Chromebooks, over 100 iPads, and around 200 MacOS and WindowsOS laptop and desktop computers. Since I support a diverse array of computing platforms, I have a lot of current, direct experience about the big differences in supporting these different kinds of devices. I love Apple devices, including iOS as well as MacOS computers, but as a technology director I positively LOVE Chrome devices. Since they were designed by Google to “use the cloud” and be managed via the cloud, Chromebooks and Chromeboxes (which require an external monitor, mouse and keyboard) are super-simple to use, maintain, and support.

If you haven’t used a Chromebook or Chromebox before, let me share some quick facts before I get into details. Chrome devices generally startup, fully, in 8 seconds or less. It’s still possible to install a bad browser extension or fall prey to a phishing scam on a Chromebook, but Chromebooks are INCREDIBLY SECURE relative to WindowsOS or even MacOS computers… They don’t get malware viruses / worms / trojan software programs the way “traditional” (older) operating system computers can and do. If you’re the person in your family providing tech support (as I am) you know how important this is. ChromeOS is a game changer. Put the power and simplicity of ChromeOS to work in your house by purchasing ChromeOS devices, if they meet your needs as described below.

Google Chromebook: You Had Me at 8 Secon by Wesley Fryer, on Flickr
Google Chromebook: You Had Me at 8 Seconds” (CC BY 2.0) by Wesley Fryer

I would definitely recommend going with a Chromebook or Chromebox as a home computer if your family members don’t need to run specific software (like Minecraft) that requires MacOS or WindowsOS. You can use an existing monitor, keyboard and mouse if you order a Chromebox. We use Chromeboxes in one of our school libraries and they have been great the past 3 years. We have ordered ASUS Chromeboxes and had good luck with them. I would definitely order one with 4 GB rather than 2 GB. You will see Chromeboxes cheaper that have 2 GB of RAM but they are much slower and won’t last as long. This one is $205 and would work well.

If you or your family members want portability, consider purchasing a Chromebook, again if you don’t need to run MacOS or WindowsOS software. Again I would stick with 4 GB rather than 2 GB models. I would look at reviews and the number of ratings/recommendations on Amazon when ordering. This one from ASUS looks good and rugged. Amazon has a good collection of Chromebooks, and you can view ratings, prices, and reviews to make a decision. You can likely go into a local Best Buy, Target or WalMart and get “hands on” with different Chromebook models. Before purchasing, however, I would check prices against Amazon. Tech journalist Kevin Tofel (@kevinctofel) maintains a great website titled, “About Chromebooks” which is filled with current reviews and helpful tips.

Instead of a Chromebox or Chromebook, if you are a little more on the techy / geeky side, you could  alternatively install Neverware’s free home edition on an existing, older WindowsPC you already have. Neverware software requires some tweaking but it is free and depending on the hardware you’re working with, it can be plenty fast and reliable. If Neverware works great for you, reach out and thank Jason Neiffer, he’s my friend who is a huge Neverware fan and mentions it periodically on our weekly podcast and webshow.

Guideline #3: Consider an Apple Laptop

ROI (return on investment) is not only important to schools and other organizations, it’s also important to families. Computers are expensive, and most folks want to get as many years of use as possible out of an investment like a laptop or desktop computer. Google provides Chrome updates for 6.5 years after a specific chipset is released, so it’s reasonable to expect five years of useful life if you purchase a Chrome device. My experiences in schools and at home with Apple / MacOS laptops, however, tell me that I can expect an even longer useful life from them. Of course Apple devices are comparatively more expensive than Chrome devices, so this is both reasonable and expected.

Generally, WindowsOS devices don’t have as long a useful working life as MacOS computers. Neverware can extend that useful life, but if you need to run WindowsOS that’s not a helpful solution.

When it comes to computer platforms, many people fall prey to baby duck syndrome:

the tendency for computer users to “imprint” on the first system they learn, then judge other systems by their similarity to that first system

While baby duck syndrome is a natural and predictable psychological condition for many people, in today’s rapidly changing technological environment, it can be both lamentable and avoidable. I encourage you to open your mind to other computing platforms and possibilities, beyond those you grew up with or are most familiar. Chrome devices are amazing and fantastic, and make every other computing platform today pale in comparison from a technical support standpoint. Although they are more expensive, MacOS and iOS devices generally “just work” and are worth the price you pay, if you need the functionality they provide.

If the ideas I’ve shared in this post are helpful to you, please let me know by either writing a comment below, reaching out to me on Twitter @wfryer, or sending me a note via my electronic contact form. Good luck in your upcoming technology purchases!

If you enjoyed this post and found it useful, consider subscribing to Wes’ free, weekly newsletter. Generally Wes shares a new edition on Monday mornings, and it includes a TIP, a TOOL, a TEXT (article to read) and a TUTORIAL video. You can also check out past editions of Wes’ newsletter online free!


Did you know Wes has published several eBooks and “eBook singles?” 1 of them is available free! Check them out! Also visit Wes’ subscription-based tutorial VIDEO library supporting technology integrating teachers worldwide!

MORE WAYS TO LEARN WITH WES: Do you use a smartphone or tablet? Subscribe to Wes’ free magazine “iReading” on Flipboard! Follow Dr. Wesley Fryer on Twitter (@wfryer), Facebook and Google+. Also “like” Wes’ Facebook page for “Speed of Creativity Learning“. Don’t miss Wesley’s latest technology integration project, “Show With Media: What Do You Want to CREATE Today?